An analysis of apollo and dionysus in greek religion and mythology

An analysis of apollo and dionysus in greek religion and mythology Published March 30, By The accelerated Noel distanced himself, his Tenerife hypnotically piling up.

An analysis of apollo and dionysus in greek religion and mythology

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After Nietzsche, others have continued to make use of the distinction. For example, Rudolf Steiner treated in depth the Apollonian and Dionysian and placed them in the general history and spiritual evolution of mankind.

An analysis of apollo and dionysus in greek religion and mythology

His major premise here was that the fusion of Dionysian and Apollonian "Kunsttriebe" "artistic impulses" form dramatic arts, or tragedies. He goes on to argue that this fusion has not been achieved since the ancient Greek tragedians. Nietzsche is adamant that the works of Aeschylus and Sophocles represent the apex of artistic creation, the true realization of tragedy; it is with Euripides that tragedy begins its downfall "Untergang".

To further the split, Nietzsche diagnoses the Socratic Dialectic as being diseased in the manner that it deals with looking at life. The scholarly dialectic is directly opposed to the concept of the Dionysian because it only seeks to negate life; it uses reason to always deflect, but never to create.

Socrates rejects the intrinsic value of the senses and life for "higher" ideals. Nietzsche claims in The Gay Science that when Socrates drinks the hemlock, he sees the hemlock as the cure for life, proclaiming that he has been sick a long time.

In contrast, the Dionysian existence constantly seeks to affirm life. The interplay between the Apollonian and Dionysian is apparent, Nietzsche claimed in The Birth of Tragedy, from their use in Greek tragedy: For the audience of such a drama, Nietzsche claimed, this tragedy allows them to sense an underlying essence, what he called the "Primordial Unity", which revives our Dionysian nature—which is almost indescribably pleasurable.

However, he later dropped this concept saying it was " The sublime needs critical distance, while the Dionysian demands a closeness of experience. According to Nietzsche, the critical distance, which separates man from his closest emotions, originates in Apollonian ideals, which in turn separate him from his essential connection with self.

The Dionysian embraces the chaotic nature of such experience as all-important; not just on its own, but as it is intimately connected with the Apollonian.

The Dionysian magnifies man, but only so far as he realizes that he is one and the same with all ordered human experience. Extending the use of the Apollonian and Dionysian onto an argument on interaction between the mind and physical environment, Abraham Akkerman has pointed to masculine and feminine features of city form.

He called scientific dissenters, who explored "the fringes of knowledge", Dionysians. He wrote, "In science the Apollonian tends to develop established lines to perfection, while the Dionysian rather relies on intuition and is more likely to open new, unexpected alleys for research The future of mankind depends on the progress of science, and the progress of science depends on the support it can find.

Support mostly takes the form of grants, and the present methods of distributing grants unduly favor the Apollonian.

Origins and Evolution

For Paglia, the Apollonian is light and structured while the Dionysian is dark and chthonic she prefers Chthonic to Dionysian throughout the book, arguing that the latter concept has become all but synonymous with hedonism and is inadequate for her purposes, declaring that "the Dionysian is no picnic.

The Dionysian is a force of chaos and destruction, which is the overpowering and alluring chaotic state of wild nature. As an example, Paglia states: Athens became great not despite but because of its misogyny.Dionysus was the ancient Greek god of wine, winemaking, grape cultivation, fertility, ritual madness, theater, and religious ecstasy.

His Roman name was Bacchus. He may have been worshiped as early as BCE by Mycenean Greeks. THEOI GREEK MYTHOLOGY. Welcome to the Theoi Project, a site exploring Greek mythology and the gods in classical literature and art.

The aim of the project is to provide a comprehensive, free reference guide to the gods (theoi), spirits (daimones), fabulous creatures (theres) and heroes of ancient Greek mythology and religion. In The Hellenic Religion of the Suffering God (), and Dionysus and Early Dionysianism (), the poet Vyacheslav Ivanov elaborates the theory of Dionysianism, tracing the origins of literature, and tragedy in particular, to ancient Dionysian kaja-net.com equivalent: Bacchus, Liber.

Olympian Gods of Greek Mythology - Greek mythology is the myths and legends the ancient Greeks centred their lives around. The ancient Greeks used it to explain the events and components of .

Summary and Analysis: Greek Mythology The Beginnings — Poseidon, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Aphrodite, Hermes, Demeter, and Dionysus Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Summary. Apollo is known in Greek-influenced Etruscan mythology as Apulu. As the patron of Delphi (Pythian Apollo), Apollo was an oracular god—the prophetic deity of the Delphic Oracle.

Mythology Part 1, Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes