Strategic contigencies model of power

Williams BA — Organizational Behavior, Grantham University July 5, Abstract The Strategic Contingency Theory is expostulated such that when an organization confronts a problem that threatens its existence the sub-unit that has the ability to successfully manage the problem will gain power and influence. This theory posits three variables to illustrate the exercise of power: It is proffered that the most effective strategic model of power is one that utilizes different skills as the complexities of the environments change.

Strategic contigencies model of power

Theory was written by D. The theory helps to objectify leadership techniques, as opposed to relying on personalities.

In situation where persons are rational agents, such as in scientific and formal academic settings, the Strategic Contingencies Theory would have more force and effect.

That is, it identifies what is common to the group -- the orientation towards problem solving -- and addresses it directly. The theory is simple and uses only the variables affecting power in contingency control by an organizational subunit.

Hickson admits that other variables may affect power but are assumed to affect it " In a generic sense, power is the ability to make others do your will, but there are many exhibitions and manners of it: As a problem besetting all theories, the context of the situation needs to be discussed as well as the dynamics of the system.

What is the structure of the system or group to be led? A uniform testing instrument does not exist to assess the predictability of the model.

There is lacking set of parameters governing the introduction of variables in power used by organizational units. Overview With Strategic Contingencies Theory, a leader depends on his problem solving skills and a projective personality that is center stage.

The leader his so because she or he is in demand and others cannot solve the problems the leader faces. This gives the leader bargainingpower. In that the leader cannot be replaced easily, he or she is not easily displaced, especially by popular will. Social processes depend upon the leader.

Strike out the leader and the system is in danger of collapsing. The ability of one to maintain leadership in a system through problem solving relies on the interconnectedness of system units department, divisions, etc.

It is defined as " Power comes from the ability to cope with uncertainty. Such ability reduces the uncertainty and persons and organizational units become dependent upon it for survival.

Here, at a subunit level of organization, the problem solving status in this case, the processing of requisitions is a function of power. Such units, if highly structuralized, mechanized and with well-defined procedures can cope better and are more resilient to uncertainty.

Regularity and perforce allows for a greater prediction of events. A leader plies on this, using her or his problem solving ability to impose regularity on uncertainty.

Hickson argues that if an organizational unit cannot substitute "obtain alternative performance", then it becomes dependent upon the leader for the one solution she or he presents. This extends to specialization, where if workers are confined to knowing only one subset of operations, a leader having knowledge of all the operations has great control.

Strategic contigencies model of power

The greater the scope of problem solving ability, the greater power a leader has. Subunit power is a function of how many other units need that subunit. Unit dependencies can override uncertainties in assessing how much power exists.

A greater dependency may be more important than the ability to problem-solve an uncertainty.

Technical Details

Here is where the Strategic Contingency Theory may not promote efficiency, functionality, or rationality [Hickson, p. That is, there may be cases where it should not be used in developing leaders. Discussion Except for newly-arising groups, it may be asked what the residual effects of a previous leader are.

This would affect how receptive the group is to a leader and of what type. A stark example of this is has been playing out in the Middle East, where a series of dictators have failed to solve problems and their method of rule has been discredited as a result. If problems had been solved, at least in a minimally acceptable way, the theory would suggest subsequent leadership styles of the same genre would be accepted.In the alternative perspective, the theory has been modified to include control of strategic contingencies as a moderating variable in the relationships between power and its determinants.

Strategic Contingency Definition A contingency is "a requirement of the activities of one subunit which is affected by the activities of another subunit. What makes such a contingency strategic is that the more contingencies are controlled by a subunit, the greater is its power within the organisation.

A uniform testing instrument does not exist to assess the predictability of the Strategic Contingencies Theory model. By subjective quantification of the vague terms, such as "power" and "problem", one almost may be able to bootstrap the desired outcome by applying convenient definitions before research begins.

Strategic Contingencies Model of Power R. A. Williams BA - Organizational Behavior, Grantham University July 5, Abstract The Strategic Contingency Theory is expostulated such that when an organization confronts a problem that threatens its existence the sub-unit that has the ability to successfully manage the problem will gain power and influence.

Name: Strategic Contingencies Theory Author: D.J. Hickson Classification: Contingency Theories Year: Theory was written by D. J. Hickson et al () Pro's. Strategic Contingencies Theory focuses on tasks that need to be done in the form of problems to be solved, thus de-emphasizing personality.

In the Strategic Contingencies Model of Power, those that have the ability to successfully address problems that threaten the organization (or its essential activities) gain power over scarce resources and influence over strategic decision making; thus creating dependency among other sub-units.

Strategic Contingency - What is it? Definition, Examples and More